Tag Archives: Motorola

Samsung and LG unveil more smartwatches ahead of alleged iWatch/iBand debut next month

Gear S G Watch R

Just a few hours after yet another report emerged claiming that Apple would be taking the wraps off of its new wearable at an event next month, both LG and Samsung have announced new wearable devices tonight.

LG has officially unveiled the G Watch R this evening, which features a 1.3-inch Plastic OLED display that is a full 360 degrees, unlike the Moto 360, which has an area of dead space at the bottom of the display. Motorola claims that the reason for the dead space on its watch is for the ambient light sensor and other display drivers. It’s unclear how LG managed to avoid having a dead area with its circular watch.

The G Watch R packs a 410mAh batter, a minuscule 10 mAh better than the original G Watch, which was not praised for its battery life by any stretch of the imagination. Other specs for the G Watch R are nearly identical to the square-faced G Watch. The device is packing a 1.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor, 512MB of RAM, 4GB of storage, and interchangeable 22mm straps. It’s also rated IP67 for water resistance. Two notable changes with the G Watch R over the original G Watch is that it features both a heart rate monitor underneath and a power button on the side of the device.

LG says the G Watch R will go on sale in early Q4 of this year. The company did not share details on pricing, except that it will “vary by market.”

Samsung also announced the Gear S smartwatch this evening, powered by Tizen. The Gear S features a 2-inch Super AMOLED display and 3G connectivity. Having 3G connectivity means that the watch is device-independent and can function when not paired to a smartphone or tablet. The device features a dual-core 1GHz processor, 512MB of RAM and a 300mAh battery, which should give two days of “typical usage,” according to Samsung.

The Gear S will be available through Samsung’s retail channels and carrier partners beginning in October.

Evidence for Apple’s wearable device has been mounting for over a year now, and with the flood of wearables from other manufacturers recently, it only seems fitting that we’re finally nearing an announcement from Apple itself. In July 2013, Apple began making a number of key hires for a wearable device. In February 2014 Apple continued hiring for a wearables team and we extensively profiled many of the new hires. Additions at that point ranged from leadership to health and fitness to fashion. We also reported that Apple is teaming up with a number of professional sports athletes for testing the fitness capabilities of its wearable product. Last month, we discovered even more wearable and fitness related additions to Apple.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, G Watch R, gear s, lg, Motorola, Samsung, Tizen

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Sweat sensor could make iWatch most personal device ever

Design questions aside, the true mystery about Apple’s long-rumored iWatch lies in exactly what types of health-related sensors the wearable might include. A recent report claims the iWatch will sport an astonishing 10 different sensors, including one for sweat. While






Nexus Q replay: Motorola’s $50 Moto Stream flings music wirelessly in your home

Motorola is making it easier to wirelessly stream music throughout your home with any devices that support Bluetooth. The company launched its Moto Stream device on Tuesday for $49.99, letting you link up to five phones or tablets to play music over the air. Moto Stream is similar to Google’s far more expensive $199 Nexus Q that launched but was quickly pulled from market in 2012.

Like the Nexus Q, you connect your own wired speakers to the Moto Stream for playback, effectively turning your woofers and tweeters into wireless speakers. You can play purchased music or tunes from streaming services such as Spotify, Google Music and Pandora.

I like the idea of Heist Mode which connects multiple devices to the unique looking music streamer: It lets several people play DJ to spin tunes. Pairing devices to the Moto Stream can be done through simple NFC tapping to simplify the connection process. Motorola says that if your device supports Bluetooth Class 1, you can control the Moto Stream from up to 300 feet away. The device works with Android, Windows and iOS phones, tablets and laptops, so unlike the Nexus Q this isn’t an Android-only concert.

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Analyst goes to Taiwan, says iWatch has a round face; will be more than one model

Moto360

Rossenblatt Securities analyst Brian Blair is citing supply chain sources in Taiwan in stating that the iWatch has a round display, and is similar in design to the Moto 360 smartwatch shown above in a Motorola teaser image, but with a slimmer profile, reports Business Insider.

According to his supply chain sources, the iWatch will have a round face. Many people were expecting it to have a rectangular face, but Blair’s sources tell him it’s going to be round, like a normal watch

We first reported hints that Apple had managed to combine multiple sensors into a single chipset in order to reduce the size of the smartwatch, suggesting that talk of a slimmer profile is credible.

Blair says that there will be more than one model, possibly one for men, one for women, mirroring earlier sketchy rumors of 1.3″ and 1.7″ models. These rumors were given greater credence when generally reliable KGI Research analyst Ming-Chi Kuo also said the iWatch would be sold in two sizes.

In contrast to earlier reports that the iWatch was already in production, Bair claims that the watch is due to enter production “around July/August.” It had previously been suggested that the watch would go on sale in August/September. We are not expecting the iWatch to make an appearance at WWDC.

The iWatch is expected to play a key role in Apple’s Healthbook app, with one analyst speculating that its cost could be subsidized by health insurers due to its anticipated focus on health and fitness.

Motorola has not given a specific launch date for its own Android-powered Moto 360 smartwatch, saying only that it would be released in “the summer.” The company’s teaser video for the watch can be seen below.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Bair, Brian Blair, fitness, Health, Healthbook, iWatch, Moto 360, Moto Hospitality, Motorola, sensors, smartwatch, WWDC

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Analyst goes to Taiwan, says iWatch has a round face; will be more than one model

Moto360

Rossenblatt Securities analyst Brian Blair is citing supply chain sources in Taiwan in stating that the iWatch has a round display, and is similar in design to the Moto 360 smartwatch shown above in a Motorola teaser image, but with a slimmer profile, reports Business Insider.

According to his supply chain sources, the iWatch will have a round face. Many people were expecting it to have a rectangular face, but Blair’s sources tell him it’s going to be round, like a normal watch

We first reported hints that Apple had managed to combine multiple sensors into a single chipset in order to reduce the size of the smartwatch, suggesting that talk of a slimmer profile is credible.

Blair says that there will be more than one model, possibly one for men, one for women, mirroring earlier sketchy rumors of 1.3″ and 1.7″ models. These rumors were given greater credence when generally reliable KGI Research analyst Ming-Chi Kuo also said the iWatch would be sold in two sizes.

In contrast to earlier reports that the iWatch was already in production, Bair claims that the watch is due to enter production “around July/August.” It had previously been suggested that the watch would go on sale in August/September. We are not expecting the iWatch to make an appearance at WWDC.

The iWatch is expected to play a key role in Apple’s Healthbook app, with one analyst speculating that its cost could be subsidized by health insurers due to its anticipated focus on health and fitness.

Motorola has not given a specific launch date for its own Android-powered Moto 360 smartwatch, saying only that it would be released in “the summer.” The company’s teaser video for the watch can be seen below.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Bair, Brian Blair, fitness, Health, Healthbook, iWatch, Moto 360, Moto Hospitality, Motorola, sensors, smartwatch, WWDC

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Walgreens & Walmart testing iBeacons, Motorola Solutions launches iBeacon marketing platform

Duane-Reade

Walgreens-owned drugstore chain Duane Reade announced today that it’s updating its iPhone app with support for iBeacons it recently installed in 10 of its New York city locations. It and Walmart are just two of the latest big name chains said to be testing the technology, while Motorola Solutions announced today its own indoor location platform that includes a combination of Bluetooth iBeacons and Wi-Fi based features.

Like other implementations that we’ve seen in retail and grocery stores, Duane Reade has installed the Bluetooth iBeacons in order to beam offers, coupons and product info to customers in proximity that have the company’s iPhone app installed:

The addition of iBeacon to the Duane Reade app vastly improves the customer in-store user experience. iBeacon is a technology Apple introduced with iOS 7 that uses Bluetooth Low Energy and geo-fencing to provide apps a new level of micro-location awareness, such as trail markers in a park, exhibits in a museum or product displays in stores. The inclusion of this technology to the Duane Reade app adds features such as lock screen notifications when initially approaching a select Duane Reade store location, coupon offers based on historical data and product reviews for timely content at the point-of-decision. iBeacon will initially be available at 10-select Duane Reade stores in Manhattan to test the viability of a further rollout.  

A report over the weekend from IndoorLBS notes that Walmart is also testing iBeacons, but the tech is still in the lab and not yet in stores for customers to take advantage of: Walmart said they are “pretty excited about iBeacons, knowing where a customer is often helps us serve them better.” Acknowledging that “90% of retail still happens in store and it has to do with proximity,” Walmart looks to iBeacons for re-inventing its stores.

We’ve reached out to Walmart for comment and we’ll update if we hear back.

Motorola Solutions is another announcing iBeacon related product today with its new MPact Platform for Mobile Marketing. The company says its “the first of its kind to offer both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth® Smart technology to engage with shoppers in the aisle when buying decisions are being made,” but that combination will notably include Bluetooth smart beacons that use Apple’s iBeacon protocol. It’s releasing SDKs for implementing the platform on both iOS and Android.

While iBeacon has mostly been adopted by retailers installing their own iBeacon hardware in stores like Duane Reade, others are embracing platforms like inMarket, a company installing iBeacons in various retailers and opening up the platform to more than just the store owner.  Perhaps the pilot at Duane Reade stores will lead to a larger roll out of iBeacon tech at other Walgreens stores.

There’s a list of specific locations with iBeacons installed in the company’s press release.


Filed under: Apps Tagged: Bluetooth, duane reade, iBeacons, indoorlbs, inMarket, Motorola, motorola solutions, mpact platform for mobile marketing, Walgreens, Walmart, Wi-Fi

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In Apple-Google case, court blows off famous judge’s plea for patent sanity

In 2012, the renowned 7th Circuit judge and intellectual property scholar Richard Posner poured a bucket of cold water on the absurd patent lawsuits engulfing the mobile phone industry. In a remarkable decision, Posner told Apple and Google-owned Motorola to pack up their lawyers and their damages expert and go home – there was no point to have a trial, he said, because neither side could show they had been harmed.

Richard Posner

It was a worth a try. Alas, on Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reversed nearly every element of Posner’s decision and gave the green light to Apple and Google to shovel more money at lawyers and experts, and start all over again.

The decision, embedded below, is a dry 99-page treatise about claim construction, presumptions and other arcana of the patent system. It faults Posner for wrongly interpreting patent claims (over “tap” and “swipe” gestures) and the rules of expert evidence, while also weighing in on when injunctions are available in the case of so-called FRAND patents.

These findings are insignificant, however, compared to what the appeals court judges did not do. Even as they declared Posner to be wrong seven ways from Sunday, they failed to acknowledge Posner’s over-arching point when he threw out the original case in 2012: that lawsuits over silly smartphone patents are inefficient and “contrary to the public interest.”

Instead of addressing Posner’s challenge directly, the appeals court instead dives deep into legal pedantry and turf-guarding: it quibbles at length over recondite rules, but never addresses the larger questions of efficiency and incentives that hat the patent system is supposed to regulate.

The Federal Circuit’s choice to blow off Judge Posner’s Apple-Google ruling is a shame, and especially so because the case is a rare instance when an outside appeals court judge has weighed in on patent law. (That’s because the Federal Circuit has exclusive jurisdiction over patent appeals but, in this case, Posner decided to sit as a lower court judge to hear the case.)

Unfortunately, the Federal Circuit appears uninterested in enriching its own opinions with the likes of Posner, a noted scholar in both intellectual property, and law and economics. Earlier this year, the court likewise rebuffed another famous judge, who is also well-versed in IP issues – it reversed Judge Alex Kozinski of the 9th Circuit, declaring that he had failed to understand patents directed at Google’s StreetView.

Ultimately, the Federal Circuit’s reluctance to hear from other judges can only add to its reputation as a “rogue” court intent on using a pro-patent bias to protect its own institutional prestige.

If there’s a silver-lining in any of this, it’s that the Supreme Court appears just as fed-up as Posner with the run-amok patent system. In recent years, the top court has issued a series of unanimous rulings overturning the Federal Circuit, and is poised to smack it down again in the field of software patents.

The Supreme Court may ultimately provide some relief to the patent plague. In the meantime, Congress should consider stepping in to strip the Federal Circuit’s power over patents and bring relief to the consumers who ultimately pay for nonsense patent lawsuits in the form of higher product prices.

Here’s the ruling:

Fed Circuit Re Posner

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