Tag Archives: macbook

Intel CEO says relationship with Apple strong amid rumors of Apple-designed Mac processors

Apple Intel

As we reported earlier this week, often reliable KGI is predicting that Apple will bring its in-house designed A-series processor to an entry-level Mac sometime in 2016 with TSMC and Samsung expected to fab the potential A9X and A10X chips, respectively. As the move to put non-Intel chips in the Mac lineup would be a departure for the company, CNBC asked Intel CEO Brian Krzanich about the chip-maker’s business plans with Apple…

Unsurprisingly, Krzanich defended Intel’s relationship with Apple despite expectations of the company designing its own chips for upcoming Macs.

When asked if he has heard anything to the effect of Apple not using Intel chips for its notebook line down the road or had specific discussions on the topic, Krzanich dismissed the notion as persistent rumors declaring that Intel’s “relationship with Apple is strong.”

“Apple is always going to choose the supplier who can provide them the most amount of capability and innovation for them to build on, for them to innovate. They’re a company based on innovation. So our job is to continue to deliver parts that have that capability, that are better than our competitors, and then they want to use our parts.”

Krzanich went on to dismiss the effect news of a potential switch from Intel by Apple had on its stock price earlier in the week. KGI did, however, include Intel as an additional baseband supplier in 2016 adding to Apple’s mix of providers.

Intel stock

As we reported earlier this week, the KGI prediction wording describes an Apple-designed A-series chip with processing power between an Atom and Core i3 chip. That processing power sits on the entry-level end of Apple’s notebook lineup suggesting the A-series chip departure from Intel will likely be saved for a future version of Apple’s upcoming 12-inch MacBook Air.

You can watch the video below of Intel’s CEO discussing the Apple chip news:


Filed under: AAPL Company, Mac, Tech Industry Tagged: A-series chips, A10X, A9x, Apple, Atom, Brian Krzanich, CNBC, Core i3, Intel, KGI, MacBook, notebooks, processors, Samsung, TSMC

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Review: Duet, the app that turns your iPad into a Lightning-connected Mac monitor

duet

I’m a big-screen fan. It’s the reason my primary Mac is still a 17-inch MacBook Pro, and why I have that hooked up to a 27-inch Apple Thunderbolt Display when I’m in my home office. When travelling, though, I have fewer pixels to play with. Sure, I could get a 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro, but I favor physical screen space over smaller screen elements.

There are existing apps out there, like Air Display, that let you use an iPad as a second monitor for a Mac, but they work via WiFi, which poses two problems. First, they often don’t work on WiFi hotspots, which you’re likely to be using when away from home. Second, even when they do work, there is an annoying amount of lag.

Which is where Duet comes in. Instead of using WiFi, it feeds the video signal from your Mac to iPad using a standard Lightning or 30-pin cable. Built by ex-Apple engineers, I figured it ought to be work well, so put it to the test … 

Setup

Setup is very straightforward. Install the Duet iOS app on your iPad, then install the companion menu bar app on your Mac. You need to restart your Mac after installing the companion app, and then you’re done.

You can also run it on an iPhone. On an iPhone 6, it would be pointless, and I’m not convinced it would be that much more useful on an iPhone 6 Plus, but the option is there if you want it.

setup

Connecting your iPad

To use your iPad as a monitor, simply connect it to your Mac using a standard Lightning or 30-pin cable (I use an Amazon Basics one, mostly because it’s black …) and launch the Duet app on your iPad. Within 2-3 seconds, the Mac will automatically detect the iPad and start using it as a second monitor.

I found the first time I connected it, it set the iPad screen to be the main one, with the dock and menu bar over on the iPad. This looked rather funky, giving a sense of what an iPad running OS X would look like, but isn’t the most useful setup.

osx

Reversing that works the same as any other external monitor: just click the Arrangement tab and drag the menu bar back to the Mac display.

menu

In subsequent launches, Duet remembered this setting, so it was a simple, one-off task.

You can also use it as a third monitor alongside a conventional one if desired.

In use

I have two Macs: a heavily-upgraded late-2011 MacBook Pro 17, and a 2013 MacBook Air 11. Duet says that the app works only with 2013 Macs and later (running OS X 10.9 or later), and this is pretty much correct–but not the whole story.

With my MacBook Air, performance is silky smooth. It’s indistinguishable from a conventional external monitor, even when playing video. I was incredibly impressed, and think you will be too. Judge for yourself:

Updated: My usage on my MacBook Pro 17 was carried out with pre-release software, in which cursor-lag was horrible. But with the latest version installed, responsiveness is–while still compromised–is still perfectly usable.

Touchscreen OS X

One really nice, uh, touch with Duet is that you can choose to control the apps on the iPad monitor using your Mac touchpad/mouse, or the touchscreen display on the iPad–switching back-and-forth between the two methods as you like.

It’s really quite fun to explore what OS X would be like on a touchscreen device. Obviously it’s not designed as a touchscreen OS, so a lot of the user interface elements are rather small for a finger, but for things like weblinks, it makes for a convenient additional means of control.

issues

Issues

Generally when using an external monitor, it will be larger than your Mac display. In this case, it’s smaller, which means any large windows you drag across to the iPad will need resizing. It’s easier to make them small before you drag them and then resize them as desired once positioned on the iPad.

I found that if I let my Mac go to sleep, it wouldn’t always automatically reconnect to the iPad. Sometimes it did, sometimes it didn’t. When it didn’t, not even relaunching Duet on my iPad worked: I had to quit both iOS and Mac apps, disconnect the Lightning cable–then relaunch both apps and reconnect the cable. Conclusion: set your Mac not to sleep when using the app.

Things were fine at the iPad end: I could switch off the iPad when I didn’t need the second monitor, and it would reconnect to the Mac within a few seconds of switching it back on again. Same thing when disconnecting and reconnecting the cable. You can also use other iPad apps and just pick up where you left off when resuming Duet.

conclusions

Conclusions

I love it. Used on a recent Mac, it’s as good as a conventional monitor (albeit a small one). Those who use chat apps for work will find it especially useful, enabling you to keep an eye on the chat while still retaining full use of your Mac screen for your actual work.

Even on older, theoretically incompatible Macs it is still useful for some applications. Granted, there is extreme pain involved in getting the app window positioned on the iPad in the first place, which could literally take several minutes when using my MacBook Pro 17, but once it’s there, it works just fine for things like Hipchat. It claims to work fine on older iPads.

At $14.99, it’s one of the more expensive iOS apps around, but given the boost it will give to your mobile productivity, I think it’s excellent value for money.

Duet requires a modern Mac running OSX 10.9+, and an iPad running iOS 7+. The Duet iOS app costs $14.99 from iTunes, while the companion Mac app is free.


Filed under: iOS Devices, Mac, Reviews Tagged: iPad, iPad as Mac monitor, iPad monitor, Lightning, Mac monitor, MacBook, MacBook Air

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Hands on: Henge Docks’ Horizontal Dock for MacBook is one of the best in the business (Video)

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 9.08.31 PM

I’ve been looking for a serious MacBook dock setup for quite some time, but really have been disappointed in the current offerings. Henge Docks displayed its Horizontal Dock as a prototype last year, but it’s now available to order and I’m pretty excited about it…

If you’re not familiar with Henge Docks, we’ve covered their products in the past, but the one really hits home for me. If you’re mainly using a MacBook Pro with Retina Display for your setup, this tough dock will provide 13 ports of connectivity. Along with that it has a sleek automated docking system that utilized motors to slowly and securely dock the MacBook Pro.

Check out our hands-on video with the Horizontal Dock below:

Henge Docks’ Horizontal Dock is made from Zinc Alloy and can be ordered now for the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display, but will also be available for the 13-inch model and MacBook Air in the future. As far as the ports go, you’ll find two TRS audio jacks, an SD card reader, HDMI output, six USB 3.0 ports, Ethernet, and two Thunderbolt 2 ports.

Along with that, the Horizontal Dock is the first third-party accessory to supply power to the MacBook Pro so you won’t have to worry about fiddling around with your power brick and cable. It automatically docks and begins powering the MacBook at the same time.

This is probably one of the best MacBook docks that you can get right now. It’s super sturdy and built to last, but you’ll pay for all of the luxuries it offers. Henge Docks’ Horizontal Dock is available to order for $399 and will begin shipping soon. For more information about this dock or other products from the company, be sure to check out their website.

9to5Mac’s CES 2015 coverage brought to you by:

QARDIO-BANNER


Filed under: Mac Tagged: CES 2015, dock, Henge Docks, MacBook, video

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Judge dismisses lawsuit against Apple over MacBook logic board failures

macbook pro

A district judge dismissed a lawsuit against Apple today in which the plaintiffs alleged that the company had willingly sold MacBooks with logic boards that were known to fail after two years. The judge said that Benedict Verceles and Uriel Marcus failed to show that Apple knew the boards were defective.

The plaintiffs have made a few big claims, including an assertion that Tim Cook was notified about the defective logic boards and did nothing to fix the issue. The judge said that since both plaintiffs were able to use their computers without issue for at least a year and a half, there was no reason to believe the boards were defective.

The complainants will have until January 22nd to amend their suit if they want to take another run at the Cupertino tech company.

This lawsuit is separate from the one that alleges Apple shipped a line of MacBook Pros in 2011 that contained defective graphics processors. That case is still in progress and was extended to include Canadian customers just last month.


Filed under: AAPL Company, Mac Tagged: Lawsuit, MacBook

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Judge dismisses lawsuit against Apple over MacBook logic board failures

macbook pro

A district judge dismissed a lawsuit against Apple today in which the plaintiffs alleged that the company had willingly sold MacBooks with logic boards that were known to fail after two years. The judge said that Benedict Verceles and Uriel Marcus failed to show that Apple knew the boards were defective.

The plaintiffs have made a few big claims, including an assertion that Tim Cook was notified about the defective logic boards and did nothing to fix the issue. The judge said that since both plaintiffs were able to use their computers without issue for at least a year and a half, there was no reason to believe the boards were defective.

The complainants will have until January 22nd to amend their suit if they want to take another run at the Cupertino tech company.

This lawsuit is separate from the one that alleges Apple shipped a line of MacBook Pros in 2011 that contained defective graphics processors. That case is still in progress and was extended to include Canadian customers just last month.


Filed under: AAPL Company, Mac Tagged: Lawsuit, MacBook

For more news on AAPL Company, Mac, and MacBook continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Judge dismisses lawsuit against Apple over MacBook logic board failures" with our community.