Tag Archives: Mac OS X Lion

Apple seeds first iOS 5.1 beta, Xcode 4.3 beta (release notes included)

Apple has just seeded iOS 5.1 to developers, a pre-release version of iOS that runs on the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. In addition, Apple has released Xcode 4.3 beta to developers, a required version of Xcode for those wishing to develop and test their applications with iOS 5.1 devices. This iOS 5.1 release is crucial. The 5.1 beta brings along an under-the-hood change for alternative interpretations for Dictation input in different apps. We’re looking into this API change.

We’ve also found some references to a new iPad in the code.

iOS SDK 5.1 provides support for developing iOS applications and includes the complete set of Xcode tools, compilers, and frameworks for creating applications for iOS and Mac OS X. These tools include the Xcode IDE and the Instruments analysis tool among many others.

With this software you can develop applications that run on iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running iOS 5.1. You can also test your applications using the included iOS Simulator, which supports iOS 5.1. There are two Xcode iOS SDK 5.1 images, one for installing on a Macintosh computer running Mac OS X 10.6.7 (Snow Leopard) or later, the other for installing on a Macintosh computer running Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion).

This version of iOS is intended only for installation on devices registered with Apple’s developer program. Attempting to install this version of iOS in an unauthorized manner could put your device in an unusable state.

Along with the release notes, you can also find some new features we’ve found in iOS 5.1 after the break:

As you can see in the screenshot below, there is a new “geofencing” setting to reportedly stop battery drain in the Reminders app when not in use. Thanks, nimvio!

In the iTunes Match settings there is now a ‘Use Cellular Data’ option to sync iTunes Match music. Thanks, Mo!

Introduction

iOS SDK 5.1 provides support for developing iOS applications and includes the complete set of Xcode tools, compilers, and frameworks for creating applications for iOS and Mac OS X. These tools include the Xcode IDE and the Instruments analysis tool among many others.

With this software you can develop applications that run on iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running iOS 5.1. You can also test your applications using the included iOS Simulator, which supports iOS 5.1. There are two Xcode iOS SDK 5.1 images, one for installing on a Macintosh computer running Mac OS X 10.6.7 (Snow Leopard) or later, the other for installing on a Macintosh computer running Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion).

This version of iOS is intended only for installation on devices registered with Apple’s developer program. Attempting to install this version of iOS in an unauthorized manner could put your device in an unusable state.

For more information and additional support resources, visit:

http://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/

Bug Reporting

Please report any bugs not mentioned in the “Introduction” section using the Apple Bug Reporter on the Apple Developer website (http://developer.apple.com/bugreporter/). Additionally, you may discuss these issues and iOS SDK 5 in the Apple Developer Forums: http://devforums.apple.com. You can also access more information about iCloud for Developers at: http://developer.apple.com/icloud

Notes and Known Issues

The following issues relate to using the 5.1 SDK to develop code.

Accounts

When creating an iCloud account, you can use any Apple ID as long as it is a full email address and not a MobileMe account. If you have a MobileMe account, you can move that account to iCloud. You can find more information at: http://me.com/move

APIs

  • The NSNetService class and CFNetService APIs do not include P2P interfaces by default. To browse, register, or resolve services over P2P interfaces, an application needs to use the Bonjour DNSService*() APIs noted below.
  • Setting the interfaceIndex parameter to kDNSServiceInterfaceIndexAny in the following API’s will not include P2P interfaces by default. To include P2P interfaces, you must now set thekDNSServiceFlagsIncludeP2P flag when using kDNSServiceInterfaceIndexAny or set the interfaceIndex to kDNSServiceInterfaceIndexP2P. The affected APIs are:
    • DNSServiceBrowse
    • DNSServiceRegister
    • DNSServiceResolve
    • DNSServiceRegisterRecord
    • DNSServiceQueryRecord

GameKit

App Icons and Profile Photos are not loading in apps using Game Center.

iCloud Storage

  • Provisioning profiles must be enabled for iCloud in the iOS Provisioning Portal. You can enable a provisioning profile for iCloud by navigating to the App ID section of the iOS Provisioning Portal and configuring your App ID for iCloud. After enabling the App ID for iCloud, regenerate your provisioning profiles to enable them for iCloud.
  • The setSortDescriptors: method of NSMetadataQuery is not supported.
  • In iOS 5, files that are protected via Data Protection cannot be used with iCloud Storage APIs.
  • File names are case-insensitive in Mac OS X but case-sensitive in iOS. This can lead to problems when sharing files between the two using iCloud. You should take steps on iOS to avoid creating files whose names differ only by case.

Movie Player

Starting in iOS 5.0, in order to facilitate finer-grained playback control, a movie player is not automatically prepared to play upon creation. Call the prepareToPlay method to prepare the movie player. For more information, see MPMoviePlayerController Class Reference

Music Player

Using shake-to-shuffle causes Music app to freeze and playback to stop.

Newsstand

FIXED: Deleting an issue that was marked as the currently reading issue could cause a crash.

Security

In iOS 5, the signing of certificates with MD5 signatures is not supported. Please ensure that certificates use signature algorithms based on SHA1 or SHA2.

Xcode/Developer Tools

  • A bug in the documentation organizer causes an exception when you type in any field in the content area. To prevent the need to log in to the developer website from Xcode, download documentation sets locally using Xcode’s documentation preference pane and enable the ‘Check for and install updates automatically’ checkbox as a workaround.
  • “uninstall-devtools” script mistakenly removes files and packages even if Xcode is still running. Be sure to quit any running copy of Xcode before starting the “uninstall-devtools” script.
  • The Network Link Conditioner daemon cannot be launched after installing the Networking Link Conditioner without a reboot. You can manually workaround the issue with a restart or by the following command: sudo launchctl load /system/library/launchdaemons/com.apple.networklinkconditioner.plist.]
  • In the iOS 5 development tools, it is possible to extract APIs used by an application and have them checked for use of private APIs. This option is offered when you validate your application for app submission.


MacBook Air still starts at $849

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For those who missed out on the Black Friday specials, Amazon still offers the entry level Core i5 MacBook Air for $849.99 plus free shipping.  That’s a significant $150 off of retail and the lowest price available.  This latest MacBook Air includes an Intel Core i5 1.6GHz “Sandy Bridge” dual-core processor, 11.6″ 1366×768 LED-backlit display, 2GB RAM, 64GB SSD, AirPort Extreme (802.11n wireless), Bluetooth 4.0, Facetime camera, Thunderbolt port, and Mac OS X 10.7 Lion.

Amazon also still has the lowest prices on the entry level MacBook Pro ($1049).  Other price lows (mostly from MacMall) can be found here.



Developer hacks his Samsung Series 7 to run OS X Lion

Samsung’s Series 7, originally intended for Windows 7, has been hacked to run a Hackintosh version of OS X Lion, a user on the tonymacx86 forums highlighted today. Awkward, considering the whole Samsung vs Apple fight. As you can see in the video above, the version of Lion runs relatively smoothly, but the big issue is an external monitor is needed to display the video. The user highlights the tools needed:

8GB USB KEY, mini-HDMI to HDMI cable/adapter, USB Keyboard and mouse. After you make a UniBeast USB key you have some space still left on it so I made a folder and downloaded MultiBeast 4.1.0: Lion Edition.

If you’ve got a Series 7 laying around and are tired of the bleh Windows, you should definitely try this hack out (if you’ve got the technical know-how). With specs close to the MacBook Air — an 11.6-inch display, 64GB SSD, and i5 processor — this device seems pretty perfect to run full on OS X in a mobile setting. It also gives you a little more horsepower than an iPad 2, though that’s like comparing Apples and Oranges.

For all of the technical details, hit up the tonymacx86 forums. We’ve already shared our thoughts on the Hackintosh community, and we’re certainly proponents of what they’re doing. We’re going to keep an eye out as this project gets more bug fixes, specifically the screen issue. Luckily, the developer says he is committed to working on this project.



Sources: Apple scrapped troubled 15-inch MacBook Air for 2010, rebuilding for 2012

The 13-inch MacBook Air of today

Had Apple’s “next-generation of notebooks” announcement in October 2010 played out as planned, the MacBook family of today would look very different. In October 2010, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs took the stage at the Apple Cupertino campus to unveil a preview of OS X Lion, FaceTime for Mac, iLife ’11 and the latest MacBook Air design as the closing “one more thing” announcement. That MacBook Air brought with it an all-new and thinner form-factor, a higher-resolution display, an incredibly light body, a large Multi-Touch single-button trackpad, flash SSD storage, and battery life improvements. 

Those aforementioned features, according to Apple, are what constitute the future of notebooks. This notebook announcement not only brought the successor to the previously available 13-inch MacBook Air, but brought along with it an 11-inch MacBook Air for the first time.

But these new notebooks weren’t the only planned pieces of the late 2010 MacBook Air story, though. Reliable sources have told us that not only were 13 and 11-inch models planned, but a groudbreaking new 15 inch MacBook Air was scheduled for a late 2010 release. Read on to learn about what could have been: 

This 15 inch MacBook Air looked exactly like the 13 and 11 inch MacBook Airs of today, and was built using many of the same parts.

But this was the problem. In late testing, these 15-inchers, which had the same hinges as the smaller Airs, were failing to reliably hold the weight of, and stay affixed to, the larger bezel/screens.  Within weeks of production, Apple made the decision that a whole new hinge would have to be designed. Unfortunately, the 15-inch Air would have to to be skipped for the current product cycle.

Prototypes of the 2010 15-inch MacBook Air are still floating around the Cupertino campus and even with its weak hinges, our sources have maintained an unhealthy amount of affection for these products.

Over the past year or so, Apple has apparently been working on a new ultra-thin 15 inch notebook – the replacement to what could have been.  These Airs will likely contain Intel’s new 22 nm Ivy Bridge processors which are not only faster with better on board graphics, but they also consume considerably less power. These processors are scheduled for release in early 2012 and we expect to see a re-designed 15-inch MacBook Air, along with updates to the MacBook Air line at the same time.

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Apple seeds OS X Lion 10.7.3 (11D16) to developers

Apple has just begun seeding OS X Lion 10.7.3 (11D16) to developers this afternoon. The set focus areas for this release are iCloud document storage, Address Book, iCal, and Mail. 10.7.3 weighs in at 633MB, and has no known issues right now. OS X Server 10.7.3 is also accompanying today’s update, with the same focus areas and build number.

Release notes after the break:

OS X Lion 10.7.3 build 11D16 Seed Note

OS X Lion Update 10.7.3 is an update to OS X Lion 10.7.

Installation Instructions

The OS X Lion 10.7.3 Update (Combo) updates

- OS X Lion 10.7, 10.7.1 or 10.7.2 GM builds.

The OS X Lion 10.7.3 Update (Delta) updates

- OS X Lion 10.7.2 GM builds.

Please be aware that you will not be able to revert back to your previous system after updating. Please install this update on a system you are prepared to erase if necessary.

Known Issues

- None

Focus Areas

- iCloud document storage

- AddressBook

- iCal

- Mail

Bug Reporting 

This build is being provided to you for testing and development purposes. Should you encounter any problems, please submit a bug report using the online Bug Reporter at <http://bugreporter.apple.com/>. Please make sure to include “10.7.3 (11D16)” in the bug title and description. This information will ensure that your bug is processed quickly.

When submitting a bug report, please make sure to include a Summary, Steps to Reproduce, Actual Results, Expected Results, the System Profile Report, and any other relevant information that is necessary to process the report.

IMPORTANT: Engineering requires additional information for crashing bugs, kernel panics, and hanging issues.

Crashing Bugs: Crash logs are required for crashing bugs. Crash logs can be located in ~/Library/Logs/DiagnosticReports

Kernel Panics: Backtraces, which contain vital information for investigating kernel panics, are required for kernel panic issues. Backtraces can be saved to nvram on restart shutdown, then copied to the panic.log file on restart. The panic.log file can be found in /Library/Logs/PanicReporter.

Hanging Issues: When an application is hung, a Sample should be provided. This can be done using the Activity Monitor (/Applications/Utilities/). To generate a Sample using this utility, click on the hung application name, then from the View Menu select “Sample Process”.



How the $300 Mini Hackintosh turned into a $750 beast

I was in New York City for a Samsung event focused on SSDs and gaming on PCs last month.  There wasn’t much in the way of new information, but Samsung gave me one of their SATA III 256GB 830 SSDs to try out.  These are within a few bytes per second of the fastest SATA3 SSDs money can buy, so I was pretty excited to get home and throw it in a Mac.

The problem is that I don’t have a worthy Mac to test it out on.  I’ve been using an Air as my exclusive machine for a year and my wife is tired of me testing stuff on her MacBook Pro.  We have a bunch of old Macs laying around the house but nothing with a SATA III connection.

Luckily, I’ve been in the market for a new Mac desktop since I replaced my MacBook Pro with an Air  last year, but to my surprise, I haven’t really found myself in need of one.  The Air drives my 30-inch display pretty well and most of my media has been offloaded to a Gigabit NAS.  Since I already have a 30-inch display, an iMac doesn’t really appeal to me.  Apple’s headless desktops don’t make sense in my situation either. A Mac Mini isn’t going to be much faster than my Air and the Mac Pro hasn’t been updated in over a year and doesn’t even have SATA 3 on board.

I also have some USB3 and eSATA peripherals that I get for testing and can’t use these products on standard Mac hardware.

I decided to give into temptation and build a Hackintosh…

Mind you, this wasn’t an attempt to build a machine for my daily use.  This is just a toy. Something to use for testing equipment I get for reviews while I write on my Air.  Plus, I had to put this fast SSD in something that can handle it –an older MacBook Pro wasn’t going to take advantage of the SATA3 speed.

At the recommendation of my Hackintosh-wielding friends, I decided to use one of TonyMacx86 Custo builds which have been tried and supported by the many forums members.  Seriously – If you are going to build a Hackintosh, head over to TonyMacx86.com.

Originally, I wanted to get in and out really simple and cheap with the $329 CustoMac Mini.  The ingredients are very basic but you are building a very modern, fast machine, with some expandability :

CPU: Intel Core i3-2105 with Intel HD 3000 Graphics - Amazon $143 ($135 last week)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H67N-USB3-B3 – MWave $93
RAM: Kingston 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 - Amazon $34
Case + Power Supply Unit: APEX MI-008 Mini-ITX with 250w PSU - Amazon $43

Yes, having the functional equivalent of a 8GB Mac Mini was only going to cost $329! I already had a drive and didn’t need a DVD Burner and I have purchased like 10 different copies of Snow Leopard and Lion. For those in need, here are some optionals components:

Optical Drive:  - Amazon ~$18
Solid State Drive: Corsair Force Series 3 120GB SATA 6Gb/s - Amazon $166, others
Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 1.5 TB SATA 6Gb/s - Amazon $80
Operating System (10.6): Mac OS X Snow Leopard $29.00
Operating System Upgrade (10.7): Mac OS X Lion $29.99 

Unfortunately, the “Custo-Mini” wouldn’t support my 30″ display with Intel 3000 Graphics -it only had 2 HDMI ports and a VGA port.  The 250W power supply would probably fail on a decent video card as well.  Otherwise, this would have been perfect (and will likely be a great build for others who only need 1080P displays).  People on Tony’s forums have tried this with processors as fast as a Core i7-2600k with no problems.

My original objective was to have a lean mean machine.  But with the 30″ monitor obligation, I now had to go with a bigger Mobo and Power Supply and therefore opted for a bigger case.  Since I got a bigger motherboard, I opted to bump up my RAM to a whopping 16GB for $98.  I also opted for the fastest consumer CPU because this motherboard does easy overclocking.  This thing turned into a beast quick but the price of ingredients is still relatively low:

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K 3.4 GHz 8 MB Cache Socket LGA1155 $315 Amazon (Overclocks above 4GHz!)
MotherBoard: GIGABYTE GA-Z68MX-UD2H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 $140 Amazon (supports Ivy Bridge)
RAM:  Kingston 16 GB DDR3 (4x4GB): $68 Amazon
Case: CoolerMaster 310 ATX (ugly but got good reviews)  $40 Amazon
Power Supply: CoolerMaster 500W $40 Amazon
Video Card:  Sapphire Radeon HD 5770 1GB $120 Amazon

So this $753 custobeast still costs less than the high end Mini but is faster than the highest-end iMac and beats the MacPro in areas like disk speed.  Some highlights

  1. The ability to run 3 simultaneous monitors including a 42″ HDTV without any issues
  2. USB3 and eSATA Ports on the motherboard which work in OSX
  3. Overclocked memory to 1600MHz and Processor to 4.0GHz while keeping system stable
  4. Lots of internal expansion including 3 PCI slots (one used for Video card) and like 10 drive bays

What I am missing from a Mac:

  1. Firewire (can easily add PCI card if needed)
  2. Thunderbolt (not possible – next year’s motherboards will have this)
  3. Optical (don’t need but easy to add for under $20)
  4. The design, warranty, and outside of the Pro, sleeker size.

Coincidentally, at the time I was finished with the hardware construction, TonyMacx86.com finished what they call the Unibeast USB installer which made things much easier than I had originally anticipated.  This utility allows you to make a bootable installer for just about any CustoMac out of your existing Lion instal image and a 8GB USB Stick.

After finishing putting the Hackintosh together (took about 45 minutes), I booted it up and changed some BIOS settings:

  1. Boot from USB drive first
  2. Change SATA control to HCPI

Your mileage may vary on these things. Consult TonyMacx86 forums – there are hundreds of people in there who have done just about any configuration out there.

Once you boot from the Unibeast installer, you’ll be asked where to install and you’ll eventually end up with a familiar  Lion install.  Once that finishes, you’ll have to tweek some settings with the “MultiBeast application” as well.

Again, I’ll again defer to Tony’s forums for this.

It took me a few hours to figure out which drivers to install, but afterwards I had a fully working Hackintosh running Lion 10.7.2 with absolutely no problems.

With the incredibly fast Samsung 830 SSD, it boots up in under 10 seconds and is faster than any other Mac I’ve ever used.  Disk read speed was about 500MB/s while write times were generally close to 400MB/s.  This is high end RAID speed except SSDs are much better at random reads and writes.  Put simply, this is as fast as you can get without breaking the bank.

The new Gigabyte motherboards and Intel Core i7s allow for easy overclocking and I was at 4GHz/1600MHz RAM in no time.  Because I simply don’t need the extra speed and didn’t want to buy a bigger heat sink for the CPU to keep it cool under high load, I am back down at normal speeds but I know some will appreciate the ability to go to 4GHz and beyond.

Running a Cinebench (before overclocking) I hit at or above a high end iMac in processor.  My Video card was relatively cheap and the results there are par for the course.

Here’s the Geekbench before overclocking (and adding the video card).  Note that this is the free 32-bit version.

Wrap up:

Apple obviously doesn’t approve of the Hackintosh scene but it is a thriving community of happy MacOS computer owners who often have a “hobby machine as their second or third “Mac”.  It is hard to blame them with the ease at which you can build a $300 Mac with 8GB of RAM and a modern processor and a lot of things Apple doesn’t offer like expandability, USB3, eSATA and overclocking.

My Hackintosh has been running fine without a blip for over a week.  In fact, some of the crashing issues I have on my Air (Twitter, Preview, iChat), don’t exist on my Hackintosh.  As for appearances, it is butt ugly, but it hides inside my desk with a faint fan hum (compared to the jets of a Mac Pro).

I had initially intended this to be a hobby machine (in fact, I wasn’t sure MacOS would work on it and had it pegged for a good Linux machine as an alternative), but it is so fast and reliable that it has become my go-to Mac.

In fact, there is something special about putting together your own computer that makes this that much better.



New MacBook Air for $899 bundled with discounted $199 AppleCare

From 9to5toys.com:

Getting the holiday shopping season started a little early this year, MacConnection is offering 9to5Mac readers the base model MacBook Air for the lowest price we’ve ever seen it: $899 (10% off) when bundled with a significantly discounted AppleCare which is just $199 (20% off).  The total $1099 price is $150 below the $1250 you’d pay at the Apple Store and over $60 less than we could find it anywhere else.

This latest MacBook Air includes an Intel Core i5 1.6GHz Sandy Bridge dual-core processor, 11.6″ 1366×768 LED-backlit display, 2GB RAM, 64GB SSD, AirPort Extreme (802.11n wireless), Bluetooth 4.0, Facetime camera, Thunderbolt port, and Mac OS X 10.7 Lion.  AppleCare provides Apple’s three year warranty.

Use code 9-5AIRCARE at checkout to get the deal.   Limit 2 per customer, and this will run out soon.