Category Archives: Tim Cook

Apple adds key Vice Presidents, more diversity to executive leadership page

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Apple today has expanded its Executive Leadership Team to include notable Apple Vice Presidents. The team shown on Apple’s official PR Bios website now includes Vice President of Special Projects Paul Deneve, Vice President of of Environmental Initiatives Lisa Jackson, Vice President and Dean of Apple University Joel Podolny, Vice President of Hardware Technologies Johny Srouji, and Vice President of Worldwide Human Resources Denise Young Smith.

Interestingly, each of these positions is fairly new to Apple: Deneve joined from Yves Saint Laurent last year, Lisa Jackson moved over from the EPA last year, Joel Podolny went full-time on Apple University earlier this year, Young Smith was promoted to head of HR earlier this year, and Srouji became head of Hardware Technologies upon Bob Mansfield’s (second) role reduction last year

All of these Vice Presidents have reported to Apple CEO Tim Cook for several months, but it is interesting to see Apple finally giving these key members of the Apple fold some public spotlight. Adding these five important executives to the website also adds two more women as Apple moves to diversify its executive branch. Apple’s PR Bios page previously only included one woman Apple employees (Senior VP of Retail Angela Ahrendts) and two female board members (Andrea Jung and Susan Wagner).

You can find the full bios of each of the new additions below:

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Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Angela Ahrendts, Apple, Burberry, human resources, Paul Deneve, Tim Cook, Vice President of the United States, Yves Saint Laurent

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iPhone 6 frenzy, Apple’s Robin Williams tribute and the rest of this week’s hottest news

Steve Jobs was known for speaking out loud, dreaming big and acting upon his thoughts. While it’s been just a few short years since his passing, fans have been able to see his characteristics shine through other personalities. The late






Tim Cook takes up Phil Schiller’s Ice Bucket Challenge during diversity week beer bash (Video)

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Update: Apple has posted an official version of this video to its YouTube channel. See the video below.

Apple CEO Tim Cook took up his marketing chief’s call to participate in the Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness for ALS during the company’s beer bash earlier tonight. During the party, which is part of Apple’s week of diversity-focused events, Cook took the stage to have a bucket of ice-cold water poured over his head.

As we reported last night, Phil Schiller was the first member of the Apple executive team to take the charity-focused challege, and petitioned Tim Cook to do the same. The two join other tech executives such as Mark Zuckerberg and Satya Nadella in helping raise awareness and money for ALS.

You can check out the video of Cook being doused below. Afterwards, Cook issued the challenge to Disney’s Bob Iger, new Apple recruit Dr. Dre, and musician Michael Franti, who actually dumped the water on Tim.

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Franti got the bucket moments later

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Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: ice bucket challenge, Tim Cook

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Apple releases promised diversity data: 55% white in US, 7 out of 10 male

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Following Apple CEO Tim Cook’s announcement last month that the company would soon begin providing diversity data, today the company is releasing its first report. While disclosing numbers on the gender and ethnicity of its employees, CEO Tim Cook has also published a letter alongside the report on the company’s website (full version below).

In the letter, Cook highlights some of the progress the company has made in recent years, but also notes that he’s “not satisfied with the numbers” and that Apple plans to do more to improve them. 

Apple is committed to transparency, which is why we are publishing statistics about the race and gender makeup of our company. Let me say up front: As CEO, I’m not satisfied with the numbers on this page. They’re not new to us, and we’ve been working hard for quite some time to improve them. We are making progress, and we’re committed to being as innovative in advancing diversity as we are in developing our products…

Apple is also a sponsor of the Human Rights Campaign, the country’s largest LGBT rights organization, as well as the National Center for Women & Information Technology, which is encouraging young women to get involved in technology and the sciences. The work we do with these groups is meaningful and inspiring. We know we can do more, and we will.

Apple’s report shows that 7 out of 10 of its employees worldwide are currently male while its workforce in the US is made up of 55% white, 15% Asian, 11% Hispanic, and 7% Black. Another 2% identify as more than one ethnicity while the remaining 9 percent chose not to declare. The report also provides a breakdown of U.S. race and ethnicity in tech, non-tech, and leadership roles:

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Along with the data published today, Apple has posted stories from employees and a new video on its www.apple.com/diversity website.

Last month during the Sun Valley conference in Idaho, Tim Cook told reporters that Apple would soon begin releasing diversity data on its workforce.

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Cook’s full letter published today is below:

A Message from Tim Cook.

At Apple, our 98,000 employees share a passion for products that change people’s lives, and from the very earliest days we have known that diversity is critical to our success. We believe deeply that inclusion inspires innovation.

Our definition of diversity goes far beyond the traditional categories of race, gender, and ethnicity. It includes personal qualities that usually go unmeasured, like sexual orientation, veteran status, and disabilities. Who we are, where we come from, and what we’ve experienced influence the way we perceive issues and solve problems. We believe in celebrating that diversity and investing in it.

Apple is committed to transparency, which is why we are publishing statistics about the race and gender makeup of our company. Let me say up front: As CEO, I’m not satisfied with the numbers on this page. They’re not new to us, and we’ve been working hard for quite some time to improve them. We are making progress, and we’re committed to being as innovative in advancing diversity as we are in developing our products.

Inclusion and diversity have been a focus for me throughout my time at Apple, and they’re among my top priorities as CEO. I’m proud to work alongside the many senior executives we’ve hired and promoted in the past few years, including Eddy Cue and Angela Ahrendts, Lisa Jackson and Denise Young-Smith. The talented leaders on my staff come from around the world, and they each bring a unique point of view based on their experience and heritage. And our board of directors is stronger than ever with the addition of Sue Wagner, who was elected in July.

I receive emails from customers around the world, and a name that comes up often is Kim Paulk. She’s a Specialist at the Apple Store on West 14th Street in Manhattan. Kim has a medical condition that has impaired her vision and hearing since she was a child. Our customers rave about Kim’s service, and they say she embodies the best characteristics of Apple. Her guide dog, Gemma, is affectionately known around the store as the “seeing iDog.”

When we think of diversity, we think of individuals like Kim. She inspires her coworkers and her customers as well.

We also think of Walter Freeman, who leads a procurement team here in Cupertino and was recently recognized by the National Minority Supplier Development Council. Last year, Walter’s team provided over $3 billion in business opportunities with Apple to more than 7,000 small businesses in the western United States.

Both Walter and Kim exemplify what we value in diversity. Not only do they enrich the experience of their coworkers and make our business stronger, but they extend the benefits of Apple’s diversity to our customers, into our supply chain and the broader economy. And there are many more people at Apple doing the same.

Above all, when we think of the diversity of our team, we think of the values and ideas they bring with them as individuals. Ideas drive the innovation that makes Apple unique, and they deliver the level of excellence our customers have come to expect.

Beyond the work we do creating innovative tools for our customers, improving education is one of the best ways in which Apple can have a meaningful impact on society. We recently pledged $100 million to President Obama’s ConnectED initiative to bring cutting-edge technologies to economically disadvantaged schools. Eighty percent of the student population in the schools we will equip and support are from groups currently underrepresented in our industry.

Apple is also a sponsor of the Human Rights Campaign, the country’s largest LGBT rights organization, as well as the National Center for Women & Information Technology, which is encouraging young women to get involved in technology and the sciences. The work we do with these groups is meaningful and inspiring. We know we can do more, and we will.

This summer marks the anniversary of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964 — an opportunity to reflect on the progress of the past half-century and acknowledge the work that remains to be done. When he introduced the bill in June 1963, President Kennedy urged Congress to pass it “for the one plain, proud and priceless quality that unites us all as Americans: a sense of justice.”

All around the world, our team at Apple is united in the belief that being different makes us better. We know that each generation has a responsibility to build upon the gains of the past, expanding the rights and freedoms we enjoy to the many who are stillstriving for justice.

Together, we are committed to diversity within our company and the advancement of equality and human rights everywhere.

Tim


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Data, diversity, female, gender, Lisa Jackson, male, race, report, Tim Cook

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