Category Archives: iOS Devices

Apple releases Heartbleed bug fix for 2013 AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule

Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 22.17.34

Apple has released a bug fix patch for its 2013 AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule, fixing the OpenSSL ‘Heartbleed’ vulnerability. The update does not apply to the AirPort Express.

Firmware update 7.7.3 is recommended for all AirPort Extreme and AirPort Time Capsule base stations with 802.11ac. It provides security improvements related to SSL/TLS. Other AirPort base stations do not require this firmware update.

Amusingly, when Heartbleed made headlines earlier this month, Apple said that no key software or services were affected. They conveniently forgot to mention that their latest router hardware was susceptible to the flaw.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: AirPort, AirPort Extreme, AirPort Time Capsule, Apple, Base station, Firmware, IEEE 802.11ac, Time Capsule

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Apple releases Heartbleed bug fix for 2013 AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule

Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 22.17.34

Apple has released a bug fix patch for its 2013 AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule, fixing the OpenSSL ‘Heartbleed’ vulnerability. The update does not apply to the AirPort Express.

Firmware update 7.7.3 is recommended for all AirPort Extreme and AirPort Time Capsule base stations with 802.11ac. It provides security improvements related to SSL/TLS. Other AirPort base stations do not require this firmware update.

Amusingly, when Heartbleed made headlines earlier this month, Apple said that no key software or services were affected. They conveniently forgot to mention that their latest router hardware was susceptible to the flaw.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: AirPort, AirPort Extreme, AirPort Time Capsule, Apple, Base station, Firmware, IEEE 802.11ac, Time Capsule

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iPhone sales could be threatened as subsidized costs become more visible, say analysts

iphones

How much did your iPhone cost? If you said $199, $299 or even $399 you’re somewhere near $350 off. As some consciously forget, the carriers often shield the owner from the real total cost of the iPhone. That may not last.

iPhone sales could be hurt as carriers switch from so-called subsidized contracts, where customers pay only a fraction of the cost a new iPhone up-front, to deals where the true cost of the phone is more visible, argues a piece in the WSJ.

Many U.S. iPhone customers are not aware that the full cost of an iPhone ranges from $549 for a 16GB 5c to $849 for a 64GB 5s. The reason is that carriers have traditionally asked for only $0 to $200 up-front, hiding the balance of the cost in the monthly tariff. With carriers now switching to separate instalment costs for the phone, and the cost of upgrading every year or two more visible to consumers, analysts believe some will choose to upgrade less often …

AT&T Inc, which reports first-quarter results Tuesday, sold 15% of its smartphones without a subsidy in the fourth quarter. UBS analyst John Hodulik estimates that figure will rise to 35% this year [...]

Brian Marshall, an analyst at ISI Group, estimates U.S. sales of the iPhone fell 20% in the last quarter of the year following a flat showing the quarter before, as sales growth continues to slow.

The consensus estimate of Q2 iPhone sales was of year-on-year growth of just two percent.

Falling sales due to a switch away from subsidies is a phenomenon that has already been seen in the UK, where it’s common to pay the full cost of the phone up-front in return for much cheaper tariffs. The result has been more people holding onto their existing handsets for three years rather than two.

Not everyone thinks a move away from the subsidized model makes sense. Verizon’s CFO Fran Shammo said that the model “has done wonders for us in this industry, so I think to abandon that I think is a mistake.” But with both AT&T and T-Mobile pushing hard for contracts which separate the cost of the phone from usage charges, it’s likely that the shift will be a permanent one.

The big unknown in all this, of course, is what Apple will offer in the iPhone 6. Make that sufficiently compelling, and consumers will want it, up-front subsidy or not. A recent survey showed that 40 percent of North American consumers planned to buy the new handset, a higher figure than for both the iPhone 5 and 5s when also measured before any official announcement by Apple.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, AT&T, Brian Marshall, iPhone, iPhone 5C, iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, iPhone sales, Subsidy, T-Mobile, UBS, Verizon Communications

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Chinese iOS malware stealing Apple IDs and passwords from jailbroken devices

malware

Security researcher Stefan Esser (via ArsTechnica) has discovered that an issue reported on Reddit as causing crashes on jailbroken iPhones and iPads is actually a piece of malware designed to capture Apple IDs and passwords from infected devices.

This malware appears to have Chinese origin and comes as a library called Unflod.dylib that hooks into all running processes of jailbroken iDevices and listens to outgoing SSL connections. From these connections it tries to steal the device’s Apple-ID and corresponding password and sends them in plaintext to servers with IP addresses in control of US hosting companies for apparently Chinese customers.

Early indications are that the source of the malware is likely to have been from a tweak downloaded from somewhere outside of Cydia. Esser has identified that the code only runs on 32-bit devices, meaning that the iPhone 5s, iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina display are safe, while other devices are vulnerable.

The blog post says that the malware is easy to check for, but may not be easy to remove. Using SSH/Terminal, check the path /Library/MobileSubstrate/DynamicLibraries/ for the presence of either Unflod.dylib or framework.dylib.

Currently the jailbreak community believes that deleting the Unflod.dylib/framework.dylib binary and changing the apple-id’s password afterwards is enough to recover from this attack. However it is still unknown how the dynamic library ends up on the device in the first place and therefore it is also unknown if it comes with additional malware gifts.

We therefore believe that the only safe way of removal is a full restore, which means the removal and loss of the jailbreak.

Cydia developer Jay Freeman, aka Saurik, pointed out on Reddit that adding random download URLs to Cydia is as risky as opening attachments received in spam emails.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, Apple ID, Cydia, IDevice, iOS, IOS jailbreaking, iOS malware, iPad, iPhone, jailbreak, jailbroken, Malware

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Chinese iOS malware stealing Apple IDs and passwords from jailbroken devices

malware

Security researcher Stefan Esser (via ArsTechnica) has discovered that an issue reported on Reddit as causing crashes on jailbroken iPhones and iPads is actually a piece of malware designed to capture Apple IDs and passwords from infected devices.

This malware appears to have Chinese origin and comes as a library called Unflod.dylib that hooks into all running processes of jailbroken iDevices and listens to outgoing SSL connections. From these connections it tries to steal the device’s Apple-ID and corresponding password and sends them in plaintext to servers with IP addresses in control of US hosting companies for apparently Chinese customers.

Early indications are that the source of the malware is likely to have been from a tweak downloaded from somewhere outside of Cydia. Esser has identified that the code only runs on 32-bit devices, meaning that the iPhone 5s, iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina display are safe, while other devices are vulnerable.

The blog post says that the malware is easy to check for, but may not be easy to remove. Using SSH/Terminal, check the path /Library/MobileSubstrate/DynamicLibraries/ for the presence of either Unflod.dylib or framework.dylib.

Currently the jailbreak community believes that deleting the Unflod.dylib/framework.dylib binary and changing the apple-id’s password afterwards is enough to recover from this attack. However it is still unknown how the dynamic library ends up on the device in the first place and therefore it is also unknown if it comes with additional malware gifts.

We therefore believe that the only safe way of removal is a full restore, which means the removal and loss of the jailbreak.

Cydia developer Jay Freeman, aka Saurik, pointed out on Reddit that adding random download URLs to Cydia is as risky as opening attachments received in spam emails.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, Apple ID, Cydia, IDevice, iOS, IOS jailbreaking, iOS malware, iPad, iPhone, jailbreak, jailbroken, Malware

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Taiwanese media claims 5.5inch iPhone 6 to be very thin, special battery components causing delays

iphone6

Via GforGames, the Commercial Times is reporting that the 5.5 inch iPhone 6 (the larger brother of the expected ~4.7 inch model) is currently facing delays due to yield issues with special battery components.

According to the report, Apple wants the 5.5 inch device to be incredibly thin requiring battery cells that are only 2mm in depth. Normal battery components are usually closer to 3mm.

Battery manufacturers are struggling to meet Apple’s requirements and this is apparently causing delays. The report speculates that the 5.5 inch iPhone may not be on sale until early 2015, because of these issues.

The 2015 timeframe should not be treated as fact, however. Timelines are very fluid and the report says that Apple will launch the device as soon as suppliers can produce good yields of the necessary components. Even if the 5.5 inch device goes on sale later than its 4.7 inch brother, it seems likely that Apple would announce the two phones at the same event.

The Commercial Times previously reported that the 5.5 inch iPhone will be delayed compared to the 4.7 inch model, due to yield issues for the displays.


Filed under: iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, Commercial Times, Inch, iPhone, iPhone 5, iPhone 6, Smartphone, Taiwan

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Apple teases Samsung in new environmental print ad: ‘There are some things we want every company to copy’

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As part of its recent environmental campaign, Apple has taken out some tongue-in-cheek full-page print advertising in newspapers around the world today. The ad reads ‘There are some things we want every company to copy’. The ad was first spotted by David McClelland on Twitter.

The ad also has been seen in Germany. The ad highlights Apple’s commitment to its green energy plans and environmental sustainability. The ad is phrased as a clear jab at Samsung, reading: ‘There’s one area where we actually encourage others to imitate us’.

This is the full transcript of the ad:

There’s one area where we actually encourage others to imitate us. Because when everyone makes the environment a priority, we all benefits. We’d be more than happy to see every data centre fuelled by 100% renewable energy sources. And we eagerly await the day when every product is made without the harmful toxins we have removed from ours.

Of course we know we can continue to do better. We’ve set some pretty ambitious goals for reducing our impact on climate change, making our products with greener materials and conserving our planet’s limited resources. So the next time we come across a great idea that can help leave the world better than we found it, we look forward to sharing.

The ad is timed alongside Green Earth Day. Apple has adorned Apple Store’s with green leaves as part of its celebrations for the event. It also released a new video ad about Apple’s environmental efforts, narrated by Tim Cook.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, David McClelland, Google, iPhone, List of newspapers in the United Kingdom, Online Communities, Samsung, Twitter

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