Category Archives: iOS Devices

Apple SIM simplifies buying international data plans with supported carriers, internal document clarifies

Screen Shot 2014-10-25 at 18.50.27

An internal Apple sales document clarifies the possible uses of the Apple SIM, which is included in cellular versions of the iPad mini 3 and Apple iPad Air 2. The Apple SIM launched with several supported carriers: T-Mobile, AT&T and Sprint in the US and EE in the UK.

Given that EE is the only available carrier in the UK, the purpose of its existence in the region was unclear. However, this document confirms that customers travelling between the US and the UK can benefit from the deal.

If American customers have chosen T-Mobile or Sprint for their domestic coverage, when travelling to the UK they will be able to use Apple SIM to open an account with EE for data without messing about with changing SIM’s. This feature will be unavailable for AT&T users, which locks the Apple SIM to its network upon activation.

This will also work for UK customers travelling to the US. With an Apple SIM, they will be able to start a data plan on T-Mobile by going to Cellular preferences in the Settings app.

Additional Apple SIMs can be purchased from Apple retail stores, if necessary. For Verizon, the document reaffirms that the company is not participating in the Apple SIM program. In addition, the language is interesting. The text refers to EE as the ‘initial participating cellular’ service provider in the UK, suggesting that more may come aboard shortly.


Filed under: AAPL Company, General, iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: apple sim, iPad, iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3

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Apple SIM simplifies buying international data plans with supported carriers, internal document clarifies

Screen Shot 2014-10-25 at 18.50.27

An internal Apple sales document clarifies the possible uses of the Apple SIM, which is included in cellular versions of the iPad mini 3 and Apple iPad Air 2. The Apple SIM launched with several supported carriers: T-Mobile, AT&T and Sprint in the US and EE in the UK.

Given that EE is the only available carrier in the UK, the purpose of its existence in the region was unclear. However, this document confirms that customers travelling between the US and the UK can benefit from the deal.

If American customers have chosen T-Mobile or Sprint for their domestic coverage, when travelling to the UK they will be able to use Apple SIM to open an account with EE for data without messing about with changing SIM’s. This feature will be unavailable for AT&T users, which locks the Apple SIM to its network upon activation.

This will also work for UK customers travelling to the US. With an Apple SIM, they will be able to start a data plan on T-Mobile by going to Cellular preferences in the Settings app.

Additional Apple SIMs can be purchased from Apple retail stores, if necessary. For Verizon, the document reaffirms that the company is not participating in the Apple SIM program. In addition, the language is interesting. The text refers to EE as the ‘initial participating cellular’ service provider in the UK, suggesting that more may come aboard shortly.


Filed under: AAPL Company, General, iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: apple sim, iPad, iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3

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Sprint’s new ‘iPhone for Life’ plan coming Nov. 14 w/ yearly upgrades, starts at $80/month

iphone6 iPhone-for-life-plan-Sprint

After last month announcing its $70/month iPhone for Life plan that allows users to “rent” an iPhone and upgrade every two years, today Sprint announced that it will be launching a new 12-month lease option starting Nov. 14. That means that iPhone 6 and 6 Plus users signing up for the iPhone for Life Plan will now be able to upgrade every year, and the old 24-month plan will become available for the iPhone 5S.

While Sprint’s iPhone for Life Plan previously cost users $70 month ($50 for an unlimited talk/data and $20/month for the device rental), the new 12-month plan will run $30, $35, or $40 depending on the capacity of the iPhone model you choose, which is on top of the $50 unlimited plan. That puts the cost of the new 12-month rental between $80 and $90 or starting at $960 for out of pocket costs per year:

iPhone-for-life-plans-comparison

The iPhone 5S will be available for an additional $18-$24 a month on top of the $50 unlimited plan depending on the capacity of the iPhone model.

Sprint says the new plans “beats Verizon Wireless’ upgrade policy, which was recently changed to make customers pay off 75 percent of the balance which is 18 months of device payments to get a new iPhone.” That comparison is to customers on Verizon’s Edge handset financing program making monthly payments, according to Sprint.

At the end of the lease in an iPhone for Life plan users can upgrade to a new device for $0 down, purchase the leased device, continue monthly payments for the same device, or return it to end the service.

Sprint plans to make the new iPhone for Life plans available starting November. 14.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: 12-month, 6 Plus, iPhone 6, iPhone for Life, lease, Nov. 14, Sprint, Upgrade, yearly

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Teardown shows iPad mini 3’s “hastily glued” Touch ID Home button makes for difficult screen repairs

iPad-mini-3-teardown-01

Following a teardown of the new iPad Air 2 earlier this week, our friends over at iFixit have now opened up Apple’s other new tablet: the iPad mini 3 … 

While the new iPad mini 3 was more of a minor refresh compared to the iPad Air 2, it does add some notable new features like the Touch ID fingerprint sensor. iFixit also found some other tweaks made to the device on the inside:

Yes—that is hot glue holding the home button bracket to the front panel. Good luck transferring that to your replacement glass. (Which you’re going to have to do, to keep the Touch ID functionality after a cracked screen repair.)

Apart from the additional glue on the home button making for more difficult screen repairs, iFixit notes the rest of the device is almost identical and thus earns the same low 2/10 repairability score as the previous generation.

So maybe the Mini fell out of step with technology’s march just a little. But hey, now you can use your new iPad Mini to pay for things (online, where supported). This is thanks to the inclusion of a Touch ID-equipped home button, hastily glued in place… The crummy cabling of the new home button wasn’t enough to earn the iPad Mini 3 a lower repairability score, but it was a close call.

The teardown also reveals a 24.3-watt-hour 6471mAh battery which, unlike the iPad Air 2, is the same size as the previous generation.

The new Home button bracket for Touch ID can be seen below:

iPad-mini-3-teardown-home-touchid-01

Chips and other components found in the iPad mini 3 that aren’t listed by Apple include:

- Apple A7 APL0698 SoC
- SK Hynix H9CKNNN8KTARKR 1 GB LPDDR3 DRAM
- SK Hynix H2JTDG8UD1BMR 16 GB NAND Flash
- Universal Scientific Industrial 339S0213 Wi-Fi Module
- Apple 343S00004-A1
- NXP Semiconductors 65V10 NFC Controller
- NXP Semiconductors LPC18A1 (Apple M7 Motion Co-Processor)
- Apple (Cirrus Logic) 338S1213 Audio Codec
- Apple 338S1199
- Fairchild Semiconductor FDMC6676BZ and FDCM6683 MOSFETs
- NXP 1610A1 Display Interface IC

A teardown of the iPad Air 2 earlier this week revealed a number of minor tweaks and, as expected, an approximately 15% smaller battery compared to the previous generation Air.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: bracket, glue, guide, home button, how to, iPad mini 3, repair, screen replacement, teardown, Touch ID

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Teardown shows iPad mini 3’s “hastily glued” Touch ID Home button makes for difficult screen repairs

iPad-mini-3-teardown-01

Following a teardown of the new iPad Air 2 earlier this week, our friends over at iFixit have now opened up Apple’s other new tablet: the iPad mini 3 … 

While the new iPad mini 3 was more of a minor refresh compared to the iPad Air 2, it does add some notable new features like the Touch ID fingerprint sensor. iFixit also found some other tweaks made to the device on the inside:

Yes—that is hot glue holding the home button bracket to the front panel. Good luck transferring that to your replacement glass. (Which you’re going to have to do, to keep the Touch ID functionality after a cracked screen repair.)

Apart from the additional glue on the home button making for more difficult screen repairs, iFixit notes the rest of the device is almost identical and thus earns the same low 2/10 repairability score as the previous generation.

So maybe the Mini fell out of step with technology’s march just a little. But hey, now you can use your new iPad Mini to pay for things (online, where supported). This is thanks to the inclusion of a Touch ID-equipped home button, hastily glued in place… The crummy cabling of the new home button wasn’t enough to earn the iPad Mini 3 a lower repairability score, but it was a close call.

The teardown also reveals a NFC chip that we’ve confirmed with sources is for use as the Secure Element in Apple Pay for in-app purchases only on the new iPads. In addition, a 24.3-watt-hour 6471mAh battery is present which, unlike the iPad Air 2, is the same size as the previous generation.

The new Home button bracket for Touch ID can be seen below:

iPad-mini-3-teardown-home-touchid-01

Chips and other components found in the iPad mini 3 that aren’t listed by Apple include:

- Apple A7 APL0698 SoC
- SK Hynix H9CKNNN8KTARKR 1 GB LPDDR3 DRAM
- SK Hynix H2JTDG8UD1BMR 16 GB NAND Flash
- Universal Scientific Industrial 339S0213 Wi-Fi Module
- Apple 343S00004-A1
- NXP Semiconductors 65V10 NFC Controller
- NXP Semiconductors LPC18A1 (Apple M7 Motion Co-Processor)
- Apple (Cirrus Logic) 338S1213 Audio Codec
- Apple 338S1199
- Fairchild Semiconductor FDMC6676BZ and FDCM6683 MOSFETs
- NXP 1610A1 Display Interface IC

A teardown of the iPad Air 2 earlier this week revealed a number of minor tweaks and, as expected, an approximately 15% smaller battery compared to the previous generation Air.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: bracket, glue, guide, home button, how to, iPad mini 3, repair, screen replacement, teardown, Touch ID

For more news on iOS Devices, how to, and Touch ID continue reading at 9to5Mac.

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Teardown shows iPad mini 3’s “hastily glued” Touch ID Home button makes for difficult screen repairs

iPad-mini-3-teardown-01

Following a teardown of the new iPad Air 2 earlier this week, our friends over at iFixit have now opened up Apple’s other new tablet: the iPad mini 3 … 

While the new iPad mini 3 was more of a minor refresh compared to the iPad Air 2, it does add some notable new features like the Touch ID fingerprint sensor. iFixit also found some other tweaks made to the device on the inside:

Yes—that is hot glue holding the home button bracket to the front panel. Good luck transferring that to your replacement glass. (Which you’re going to have to do, to keep the Touch ID functionality after a cracked screen repair.)

Apart from the additional glue on the home button making for more difficult screen repairs, iFixit notes the rest of the device is almost identical and thus earns the same low 2/10 repairability score as the previous generation.

So maybe the Mini fell out of step with technology’s march just a little. But hey, now you can use your new iPad Mini to pay for things (online, where supported). This is thanks to the inclusion of a Touch ID-equipped home button, hastily glued in place… The crummy cabling of the new home button wasn’t enough to earn the iPad Mini 3 a lower repairability score, but it was a close call.

The teardown also reveals a 24.3-watt-hour 6471mAh battery which, unlike the iPad Air 2, is the same size as the previous generation.

The new Home button bracket for Touch ID can be seen below:

iPad-mini-3-teardown-home-touchid-01

Chips and other components found in the iPad mini 3 that aren’t listed by Apple include:

- Apple A7 APL0698 SoC
- SK Hynix H9CKNNN8KTARKR 1 GB LPDDR3 DRAM
- SK Hynix H2JTDG8UD1BMR 16 GB NAND Flash
- Universal Scientific Industrial 339S0213 Wi-Fi Module
- Apple 343S00004-A1
- NXP Semiconductors 65V10 NFC Controller
- NXP Semiconductors LPC18A1 (Apple M7 Motion Co-Processor)
- Apple (Cirrus Logic) 338S1213 Audio Codec
- Apple 338S1199
- Fairchild Semiconductor FDMC6676BZ and FDCM6683 MOSFETs
- NXP 1610A1 Display Interface IC

A teardown of the iPad Air 2 earlier this week revealed a number of minor tweaks and, as expected, an approximately 15% smaller battery compared to the previous generation Air.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: bracket, glue, guide, home button, how to, iPad mini 3, repair, screen replacement, teardown, Touch ID

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Apple iPad mini 3 unboxing and first impressions (Video)

ipad-mini-3

Along with Apple’s iPad Air 2, the iPad mini 3 also hit store shelves during a silent weekday release. If you don’t currently own an iPad mini, it’s probably a better time than ever to pick one up, but I wouldn’t really recommend getting Apple’s latest and greatest. Let me tell you why…

Inside of the iPad mini 3, you’ll find a dual-core Apple A7 chip clocked at 1.3GHz, 1GB of RAM, a quad-core PowerVR G6430 GPU, and a 6,470 mAh battery. The iPad mini’s Retina display is 7.9-inches with a resolution of 1,536 x 2,048 (324 ppi). On the back side you’ll find a 5-megapixel shooter, while the front side is home to the 1.2-megapixel FaceTime camera. If any of these specifications sound familiar, it’s because they were also inside of the iPad mini 2.

Apple’s iPad mini 3 is nearly identical to its predecessor. In fact, the only difference between the iPad mini 2 and 3 is the addition of Touch ID and a gold color option. Aside from that, you won’t find any new and exciting hardware. Is this a disappointment? If the iPad lover within you needs to have a gold mini with Touch ID, that’s totally fine, but in my opinion you’re better off purchasing the iPad mini 2 as it’s available for $100 less.

Check out our iPad mini 3 unboxing and first impressions video below:

Keep in mind, the base iPad mini models only come in 16GB configurations. If you’re planning on loading it up with apps and other media, you might want to opt for a 64GB mini 3 at $499 or get a 32GB iPad mini 2 for $349. Apple’s iPad mini 2 is now the only place you’ll find a 32GB configuration for the mini lineup and it might be the best deal if you don’t care about Touch ID.

I’m not sure that the iPad mini 3is  worth upgrading to over the second generation. Here’s my advice: If you’re in the market for a new Apple tablet, save $100 and buy a 16GB iPad mini 2 for $299 or get the 32GB model for $50 more. What do you think about the iPad mini 3?


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, iPad Air 2, iPad mini, iPad mini 3, Retina iPad mini

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