Category Archives: Apple Inc

The value of Apple Pay in one stat: almost half of Americans have had card details stolen

apple-pay

Apple Pay may be more convenient than carrying around a whole bunch of different cards, and contactless payment is certainly very quick and easy, but it’s the security which is arguably the greatest benefit. Your actual card details are never stored in your phone or on an Apple server, and only a one-time code is sent to the payment terminal. Retailers never see your card details.

Just how important is this? A WSJ/NBC News poll reveals that a full 45% of Americans have been told by a retailer, bank or card company that their card details have been stolen in a data breach.

In the past year alone, major breaches have been reported at Target, J.P. Morgan Chase, Home Depot, K-Mart, SuperValu and others […] 

Some 45% of Americans said they had received such a breach notification letter from a retailer or card-issuer that their payment data had been affected by a breach

Fifteen percent of those polled also said that they had been hit by online fraud or hacking.

Apple Pay is currently only available in the US, but a job listing recently revealed that Apple is working on bringing the service to Europe and beyond.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Apple Inc, Apple pay, chip and pin, contactless payment, Credit card, Credit card breach, Credit card hack, Debit card, iOS, iPhone, Mobile payment

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Tim Cook “deeply offended” by BBC allegations of poor working conditions in iPhone factories

apple-china

In a letter to UK staff, Tim Cook is said to have been “deeply offended” by allegations made in a BBC undercover documentary that Apple had broken promises over the working conditions in Pegatron’s iPhone factories in China, reports the Telegraph.

In an email to around 5,000 staff across the UK, Apple senior vice president of operations Jeff Williams said both himself and the chief executive were “deeply offended by the suggestion that Apple would break a promise to the workers in our supply chain or mislead our customers in any way”.

“Panorama’s report implied that Apple isn’t improving working conditions,” he continued. “Let me tell you, nothing could be further from the truth.”

Williams said that Apple had provided both “facts and perspective” on the allegations, but the BBC had chosen not to include these in the program … 

Apple’s statement to the BBC had said that while there was always more to be done, it was not aware of any company doing as much as Apple to safeguard working conditions in its supplier factories. Cook has on previous occasions said that Apple is unique in auditing not only its direct suppliers, but also tier 2 and tier 3 suppliers.

Williams also commented on the thorny issue of child labour in Indonesian tin mines, whose output feeds into the Apple supply chain, stating that Apple made the more moral choice by working for change in the country.

Apple has two choices: We could make sure all of our suppliers buy tin from smelters outside of Indonesia, which would probably be the easiest thing for us to do and would certainly shield us from criticism. But it would be the lazy and cowardly path, because it would do nothing to improve the situation for Indonesian workers or the environment since Apple consumes a tiny fraction of the tin mined there. We chose the second path, which is to stay engaged and try to drive a collective solution.

Apple has for the past eight years published an annual Supplier Responsibility Progress Report detailing the result of its own audits and the steps that have been taken in response to problems identified in its supply-chain. Its most recent report said that compliance with its maximum working week of 60 hours hit 95%.

The company also commissioned independent audits from the Fair Labour Association, and has said that it will cut ties with suppliers which fail to to meet FLA standards.

Those in the UK (or using a UK web proxy) can watch the program on iPlayer. The full text of Williams’ letter to UK staff can be read below.  Continue reading

Tim Cook “deeply offended” by BBC allegations of poor working conditions in iPhone factories

apple-china

In a letter to UK staff, Tim Cook is said to have been “deeply offended” by allegations made in a BBC undercover documentary that Apple had broken promises over the working conditions in Pegatron’s iPhone factories in China, reports the Telegraph.

In an email to around 5,000 staff across the UK, Apple senior vice president of operations Jeff Williams said both himself and the chief executive were “deeply offended by the suggestion that Apple would break a promise to the workers in our supply chain or mislead our customers in any way”.

“Panorama’s report implied that Apple isn’t improving working conditions,” he continued. “Let me tell you, nothing could be further from the truth.”

Williams said that Apple had provided both “facts and perspective” on the allegations, but the BBC had chosen not to include these in the program … 

Apple’s statement to the BBC had said that while there was always more to be done, it was not aware of any company doing as much as Apple to safeguard working conditions in its supplier factories. Cook has on previous occasions said that Apple is unique in auditing not only its direct suppliers, but also tier 2 and tier 3 suppliers.

Williams also commented on the thorny issue of child labour in Indonesian tin mines, whose output feeds into the Apple supply chain, stating that Apple made the more moral choice by working for change in the country.

Apple has two choices: We could make sure all of our suppliers buy tin from smelters outside of Indonesia, which would probably be the easiest thing for us to do and would certainly shield us from criticism. But it would be the lazy and cowardly path, because it would do nothing to improve the situation for Indonesian workers or the environment since Apple consumes a tiny fraction of the tin mined there. We chose the second path, which is to stay engaged and try to drive a collective solution.

Apple has for the past eight years published an annual Supplier Responsibility Progress Report detailing the result of its own audits and the steps that have been taken in response to problems identified in its supply-chain. Its most recent report said that compliance with its maximum working week of 60 hours hit 95%.

The company also commissioned independent audits from the Fair Labour Association, and has said that it will cut ties with suppliers which fail to to meet FLA standards.

Those in the UK (or using a UK web proxy) can watch the program on iPlayer. The full text of Williams’ letter to UK staff can be read below.  Continue reading

Should Apple double the RAM in next year’s iPhones and iPads? [Poll]

ram

2 x 1GB RAM in iPad Air 2 shown in orange (ifixit.com)

A Taiwanese financial news site cited by Apple Toolbox claims that Apple plans to double the RAM in next year’s iPhones from 1GB to 2GB, and the iPad Air from 2GB to 4GB.

As sources of Apple-related news goes, the citation has to rank somewhere in the Digitimes arena, but it was a Taiwanese supply-chain rumor (dart throwing?) that correctly predicted the previous RAM doubling from 1GB in the original iPad Air to 2GB in the iPad Air 2 – albeit a prediction made rather closer to launch … 

Apple has always been somewhat stingy with RAM compared to similarly high-end Android devices, but a direct comparison is unfair. The tight integration between hardware and software has enabled Apple to maximize the efficient use of RAM. And while the financial cost of adding a further 1-2GB of RAM is small, additional RAM also consumes more power.

The power consumption difference isn’t significant in standby mode, but does become a little more so during read and write operations. We’re still talking small differences, but for the iPad in particular where all-day battery-life has long been a key attraction of the device, each individual power-saving adds up.

That said, there’s no doubt that the 2GB RAM in the iPad Air 2 made a real difference. I’ve definitely seen reduced page refreshing when running multiple tabs in Safari since upgrading from the original Air, and judging from the number of threads in the Apple Support Communities, there is certainly demand for the same on the iPhone.

If you’ve upgraded to the iPad Air 2, have you noticed a real improvement? And for iPhone owners, how big a deal would it be to get more RAM? As ever, let us know your views in the poll and comments.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple Inc, iPad, iPad Air 3, iPhone, iphone 6s, RAM

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Siri founder Adam Cheyer tells the story of its creation in this hour long video

While the video is at times technical and “in the weeds” it is a great overview of the creation of Siri that I hadn’t yet seen.  Mixed in are anecdotes about Apple, Steve Jobs and other players that made the technology happen.

Walking backward in time, Adam discussed the technical history of Siri as well as how the vision of virtual personal assistants evolved over time. He wowed the audience with a video from 1987 on a concept from Apple where predicted a Siri like device 24 years in the future and was only off by 2 weeks.

The talk is from the Listen 2014 Conference given last month. Cheyer left Apple in late 2012 and has started work on a new Startup

 


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple Inc, Cheyer, Darpa, Siri, Steve Jobs

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Sony “stuck in 1992″ after hacks – except for Macs, iPads and iPhones

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sony-hack

A Sony employee has described the company as being “stuck in 1992″ following the massive hacks, with employees desperately trying to avoid using any technology that could be compromised, reports TechCrunch.

“Some people had to send faxes. They were dragging old printers out of storage to cut checks,” she said. “It was crazy.”

The company is even encouraging staff to avoid using phones – presumably including the company’s own Android Xperia smartphones and tablets – in favor of face-to-face meetings.

There has, though, been one exception to the ban on modern technology: Apple kit.

“People using Macs were fine,” she said. She said most work is done on iPads and iPhones.

Sony may need to buy a few extra Macs, with some departments having only one or two computers for the entire office. It is, she said, like “living in an office from ten years ago.”

Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices, Mac Tagged: Android, Apple Inc, iOS, iPad, iPhone, Mac, Sony, Sony hack, Xperia

Continue reading more about AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and iPhone at 9to5Mac.

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Sony “stuck in 1992″ after hacks – except for Macs, iPads and iPhones

sony-hack

A Sony employee has described the company as being “stuck in 1992″ following the massive hacks, with employees desperately trying to avoid using any technology that could be compromised, reports TechCrunch.

“Some people had to send faxes. They were dragging old printers out of storage to cut checks,” she said. “It was crazy.”

The company is even encouraging staff to avoid using phones – presumably including the company’s own Android Xperia smartphones and tablets – in favor of face-to-face meetings.

There has, though, been one exception to the ban on modern technology: Apple kit.

“People using Macs were fine,” she said. She said most work is done on iPads and iPhones.

Sony may need to buy a few extra Macs, with some departments having only one or two computers for the entire office. It is, she said, like “living in an office from ten years ago.”


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices, Mac Tagged: Android, Apple Inc, iOS, iPad, iPhone, Mac, Sony, Sony hack, Xperia

Continue reading more about AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and iPhone at 9to5Mac.

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